Skip to Main Content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

PHO 421 / PHO 521 - History of Photography, Film and Art: Videos / Image Collections

This Guide presents Library resources to assist you in finding articles and information for PHO 421 / PHO 521

Streaming Video Collections

Hockney on Photography

Hockney on Photography

The career of one of Britain’s greatest painters tells us as much about his skill with a camera as his facility with a brush. In this program, David Hockney invites viewers on a journey of discovery that traces the evolution of his photographic work—from his initial experiments in the 1970s through the high point of his photo collage period, exemplified in Nude, featuring Theresa Russell, and another crowning achievement, Pearblossom Highway. The film was produced with unprecedented access not only to the artist himself but to his huge photographic archive, much of which has never been shown publicly. Hockney’s use of photography in related media, such as drawing, painting, fax art, and photocopying, is also explored in detail. (52:00)

World of Ideas: Susan Sontag (Segment)

World of Ideas: Susan Sontag

The late Susan Sontag was not a photographer, yet her famous book On Photography is required reading in almost every serious photography course in the world. Her novels and nonfiction books such as Illness as a Metaphor have been translated into a score of languages. And she also wrote and directed films and plays. In this program, the renowned writer and human rights activist talks with Bill Moyers about Regarding the Pain of Others, her book on war and how the images of war affect people's perception of reality, and other aspects of her life and career. (complete title: 49 minutes)

Segment below From World if Ideas is "Pictures of War in Media"

Sontag believes that most pictures of war in media should not be allowed. The moral situation of photographers is a very painful one and many talk about the anguish of photographing horrific events. (04:47)